Indigenous cultural & intellectual property
Artwork Made Using Animal and Plant Material - Australia

Australia has strict laws that aim to protect plants and animals that are threatened, native, vulnerable or endangered. This is a particularly important issue for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island artists who often use native seeds, feathers, skins, bones, grasses and woods in their artwork. It can also affect non-Indigenous artists wanting to create artwork using plant and animal matter.

Artwork made using Animal and Plant Material - South Australia

For many artists, plant and animal material form a central part of the artworks that they create. This can raise unique legal issues, as certain plants and animals are subject to strict laws in Australia that change depending on which state you work in.

Artwork made using Animal and Plant Material - Victoria

For many artists, plant and animal material form a central part of the artworks that they create. This can raise unique legal issues, as certain plants and animals are subject to strict laws in Australia, differing depending on which state you work in.

Certificates of Authenticity (AITB)

The authenticity of an Aboriginal artwork is important not only for ethical and legal reasons but because it has significant value in the art market. The problem facing Aboriginal artists and communities is how to protect authentic artwork from rip offs made by non-Indigenous people.

Copyright Licensing for Art Centres & IP Licensing Toolkit

This information sheet explains how art centres can systematically manage copyright licensing requests for the use of artists’ work and describes the various sample agreements contained in the Art Centre Intellectual Property Licensing Toolkit. It can be used in conjunction with the suggested Copyright Licence Fee Schedules (only available in the IP Licensing Toolkit)

Cultural and Intellectual Property Policies

We have four Cultural and Intellectual Property Policies available to ensure you are following best practice policies when working with Indigenous art centres and artists.

Drama, Performance And Dance (AITB)

This fact sheet provides information on the nature of copyright in dramatic works, the rights of copyright owners, when to get permission from the copyright owner, exceptions to the need to get permission, duration of copyright and royalties.

Performers’ rights

Actors, circus performers, musicians, dancers and other live performers may have performers’ rights in their performances, read on to learn more about these rights.

Story Telling - Legal Issues (Artists in the Black Resource)

The art of oral story telling is a fluid art form, and legal issues including copyright, moral Rights and Indigenous Cultural Intellectual Property can arise. Read on to learn more about protecting your rights in this form of story telling.